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the epicenter of primary wave 3 up is gonna make us


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#21 OEXCHAOS

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 04:39 PM

https://twitter.com/...253146464673794

Some figures to illustrate above.

 

Are you talking about corporate debt or government debt?


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#22 da_cheif

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 04:46 PM

rising rates are a product of an exploding economy....the stock markets discounting mechanism is promising both.....the real fun begins when rates start to rise.....the money supply will skyrocket........at a click of a button ....lending button



#23 alexnewbee

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:00 AM

https://twitter.com/...253146464673794

Some figures to illustrate above.

 
Are you talking about corporate debt or government debt?
Both
"we do G.d's work" Lloyd Blankfein

#24 gm_general

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:01 PM

https://twitter.com/...253146464673794

Some figures to illustrate above.

 

On that subject its harder and harder to find the chart I was looking for - one of total interest all on outstanding debt public and private. Quandl site was nice enough to provide it as I have given up on the BEA site after the crazy useless reorganization. Here it is:

 

http://www.quandl.co...om-1946-to-2016

 

What I wanted to know was with rate hikes of late and increasing debt is there any effect on the total interest paid - just a bit so far. Its a cost of about $2.5T in interest yearly, it was $2.4 or so before. Which is about 13-14% of (admittedly kludged) GDP. Observe the chart I made which is now about 2 years out of date - in the last 3 recessions they happened when the interest costs exceeded 20% of GDP - when this cost dropped back below 20%, the recession ended. So if rates and increased debt push this above the 20% line, look out. Now is there some other monetary factor that has lowered this threshold? I have no idea. Many real numbers such as real (pre-1994 method) unemployment have been holding at levels they were at since the crash.

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  • Percent of GDP Paid in Interest vs Recessions.jpg


#25 da_cheif

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:10 PM

 

https://twitter.com/...253146464673794

Some figures to illustrate above.

 

On that subject its harder and harder to find the chart I was looking for - one of total interest all on outstanding debt public and private. Quandl site was nice enough to provide it as I have given up on the BEA site after the crazy useless reorganization. Here it is:

 

http://www.quandl.co...om-1946-to-2016

 

What I wanted to know was with rate hikes of late and increasing debt is there any effect on the total interest paid - just a bit so far. Its a cost of about $2.5T in interest yearly, it was $2.4 or so before. Which is about 13-14% of (admittedly kludged) GDP. Observe the chart I made which is now about 2 years out of date - in the last 3 recessions they happened when the interest costs exceeded 20% of GDP - when this cost dropped back below 20%, the recession ended. So if rates and increased debt push this above the 20% line, look out. Now is there some other monetary factor that has lowered this threshold? I have no idea. Many real numbers such as real (pre-1994 method) unemployment have been holding at levels they were at since the crash.

 

u worry 2 much