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Factory Model Schools


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#1 stocks

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 08:05 AM

Factory model schools feature: top-down management, separation from the community, emphasis on behavior and school management, centralized planning, standardization, outcomes designed to meet societal needs, and efficiency in producing results. These characteristics are compared to the factory system of production. 

 

They employ direct instruction methods: a teacher drilled information into the class in "assembly line fashion", the students learn by rote copying and memorization, and they are then tested on the information presented to them. This method is also referred to as "sage on the stage". 

 

The Factory model also features depersonalization, strict hierarchy of authority, uniformity over innovation, process and procedure, and standardization of curriculum, testing, class sizes, time periods, and learning rates. 

 

The origins of factory model education date back to the Prussian educational system introduced into what is now eastern Germany in the late 18th century by Frederick the Great. It was brought to national attention by Horace Mann after a visit to Prussia in 1843. Mann, then secretary of the Massachusetts board of education  has been styled as "the father of the American public school system."[4] 

 

He studied many educational systems before promoting and introducing universal, free, and secular education based on the Prussian model as the most efficient way known to teach literacy on a large scale.[4] Within six decades every state in the USA had introduced a similar system.[5]

  

 

 https://en.wikipedia...ry_model_school

 


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If liberty means anything it means the right to  tell people what they do not want to hear. - George Orwell


#2 stocks

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 04:36 PM

Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling 

 

Gatto points out that the public schooling apparatus serves to teach bureaucratic structure, rather than content. The form and structure always take precedence over the individual. Students exit the public schooling assembly line even more intellectually and psychologically dependent than when they entered it. This isn't an accident.

 

They learn to put aside individual interests, talents and the innate human love of learning to make room for absorbing what others would direct them to learn and parrot.

 

They learn to organize their daily lives into little slivers deemed valuable by those in authority, to passively submit to an unjustified authoritarian hierarchy and to substitute lived experience and understanding with carbon copies. 

 

In fact, the objective of modern institutionalized schooling, according to Gatto, is production of valuable worker bee drones with "marketable skills" for the modern workplace-- people who submit to systematized authority without asking questions or rocking the boat. 

 

  

https://www.amazon.c...ws&pageNumber=2

 

 


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If liberty means anything it means the right to  tell people what they do not want to hear. - George Orwell


#3 stocks

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 08:18 AM

When it comes to historical accuracy, there isn’t much of it when it comes to a discussion of civil government. Those who write today’s textbooks have been trained in institutions that have been funded by the state.

 

Keynesianism and the foreign-policy of the Council on Foreign Relations have dominated academia for as long as they have dominated policy-making in Washington. 

 

If you look at the textbooks’ accounts of every American war since 1775, you will find few discussions of the following:

 

(1) how a small minority of political organizers favoring a war did their work to pull the American people into the war;

(2) financing the war, especially by fractional reserve banks;

(3) the aftermath of the war in which the level of both taxation and government debt increased dramatically, leading to the next war. We need a minimum of a 350-page monograph, divided into three parts, for every American war since 1775. We do not have even one such volume.

 

We need detailed discussions of why the United States, and Massachusetts as early as 1690, invaded Canada. Why did America keep going to war against Canada? This topic is rarely discussed in monographs, let alone textbooks. 

 

 

https://www.lewrockw...sing-history-2/

 

 

 


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If liberty means anything it means the right to  tell people what they do not want to hear. - George Orwell