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#1 stocks

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 09:15 AM

The multiple major hurricane strikes of 2017 should be a wakeup call.
 
Disastrous hurricanes have always occurred, and it is only a matter of time before we experience our first $1 Trillion hurricane catastrophe.
 
 
As coastal development and population has skyrocketed in recent decades, our vulnerability of a major metropolis like Miami to a direct hit by another Category 5 hurricane has only increased. 
 
Most people do not realize just how short a period of time that a hurricane-prone area like South Florida has had appreciable population: from only 300 people in 1896 to over 6 million people today in the Miami – Fort Lauderdale area.
 
In 1970  a tropical cyclone struck East Pakistan, killing as many as 500,000 people. These are the kinds of weather disasters that modern technology and prosperity allow us to avoid with satellite monitoring, strong buildings, and seawalls. So, let us not be fooled by our favorite celebrities or pop-science personalities. Major hurricanes have always been, and always will be, a threat to coastal residents and infrastructure, and nothing that we do energy policy-wise is going to change that fact.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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 “Men think in herds and go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.” 

― Charles MacKay


#2 stocks

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 03:50 PM

The 1900s started off with the greatest natural disaster in the history of the United States when the Great Galveston Hurricane killed an estimated 6,000 to 12,000 people on September 8, 1900.  With winds estimated at 130 to 140 mph and a 15 foot storm surge, the tempest virtually wiped out the city, with 3,600 buildings destroyed.
 
The 21 year period from 1941 to 1961 was particularly active for landfalling major hurricanes with nearly one per year on average. Then the 1980s were fairly inactive, averaging one every two years.  A large upswing in activity occurred when a total of seven major hurricanes were experienced in 2004 and 2005, but then nearly 12 years passed before major Hurricane Harvey hit Houston in 2017. That most recent major hurricane ‘drought’ is believed to be something that happens only once every 250 to 300 years.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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 “Men think in herds and go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.” 

― Charles MacKay


#3 stocks

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Posted 01 May 2018 - 07:59 PM

The processes that allow a minor hurricane to strengthen into a major hurricane are not well understood and, as a result, predictions of intensification are not very good. 

 
Hurricane Irma in 2017 became a major hurricane in the central Atlantic over only modestly warm water temperatures.
 
Irma’s unusually low wind shear (a change in wind speed or direction with height) allowed the atmosphere close to it's rain showers to warm and a strong low pressure to develop.  Unusually warm sea surface temperatures were not present as Irma became a major Category 3 hurricane, long before it reached the warmest sea surface temperatures around the Bahamas, northern Caribbean islands, and the Straits of Florida.
 
In fact, the Gulf of Mexico and area around the Bahamas are warm enough every summer to support a catastrophic hurricane. That such hurricanes almost never develop is not due to a lack of warm surface waters. It is more often the result of too much wind shear, or the absence of a preexisting cyclonic circulation in the lower atmosphere to kick-start cyclone formation.
 
 

 

 

 

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 “Men think in herds and go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.” 

― Charles MacKay


#4 stocks

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Posted 29 May 2018 - 08:51 AM

Dennis Feltgen, a National Hurricane Center spokesman, said 2017 got everyone’s attention. Will 2018 be another destructive year?
 
His reply: “You have six months to get ready. Use your time wisely.” 
 
 
The Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) for an entire season is the sum of all the named storms combined. Seasons with ACE totals of 153 or more are considered hyperactive. 
 
The 2017 season produced the seventh highest ACE total, dating back 166 years. With an ACE total of 223.12, this season was about double the intensity of the normal season median of 110.5.
The most active hurricane season on record was 1933 (ACE value: 258.57.) There have been only nine seasons with ACE values of more than 200. The other eight:
 
2005 (250.13); 1897 (231.15); 1926 (229.56); 1995 (227.103); 2004 (226.88); 2017 (223.12); 1950 (211.283) and 1961 (205.40). 
 
 
 
 

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 “Men think in herds and go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.” 

― Charles MacKay


#5 stocks

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Posted 09 June 2018 - 11:31 AM

Only 3 Category-5 hurricanes have ever hit the U.S. 

 

The only Category 5 hurricanes to hit the U.S. are:

 

Andrew in 1992,

Camille in 1969

Labor Day unnamed storm in 1935. 

 

 

 

 

https://www.usatoday...-u-s/633616001/

 


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 “Men think in herds and go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.” 

― Charles MacKay


#6 stocks

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Posted 06 August 2018 - 06:04 PM

Hurricanes rarely reach New England, but when they do, they can be deadly. 

 

Hurricanes Carol and Edna (1954)

 

Carol touched down as a Category 3 on August 31, 1954. With 100 mph winds, sometimes gusting up to 135 mph, Carol caused 68 deaths and over $460 million in damage, including destroying 4,000 homes, 3,500 cars, and over 3,000 boats. In downtown Providence water depths reached 12 feet, and strong winds knocked down the spire of the historic Old North Church in Boston. Just days later on September 11, Hurricane Edna made landfall in Maine and went on to cause another 2 deaths and $40 million in damage

 

Hurricanes Connie and Diane (1955)

 

Hurricane Connie formed on August 3, 1955 starting as a tropical storm. It hit North Carolina on August 13, 1955 as a Category 2 hurricane. Bands of heavy rain and wind reached southern New England and damages totaled nearly $86 million. Days later, Category 2 Diane made landfall, causing significant flooding and damage throughout southern New England. Diane still holds the record for wettest hurricane to hit Massachusetts, with rain accumulation reaching 19.75 inches. Diane was the costliest hurricane of the 1950s  

 

 

 

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Edited by stocks, 06 August 2018 - 06:07 PM.

-- 

 “Men think in herds and go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.” 

― Charles MacKay


#7 stocks

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Posted 13 September 2018 - 11:07 AM

# of major (cat 3-5) hurricanes making landfall in Florida have decreased

 

 

1915-1965 51 years

 

15 major hurricanes made landfall

 

 

1966-2016 51 years

 

4 major hurricanes  

 

 

 

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-- 

 “Men think in herds and go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.” 

― Charles MacKay


#8 AChartist

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Posted 15 September 2018 - 09:07 PM

I heard a military pilot say they can stop them and drop all their water by carpet bombing dry ice in from the top.

 

So they are all fake.


Edited by AChartist, 15 September 2018 - 09:08 PM.

"marxism-lennonism-communism always fails and never worked, because I know

some of them, and they don't work"  M.Jordan


#9 stocks

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 08:26 AM

Mexico Beach, Florida 

 

The roadways and transit hubs are a mess, without a heavy duty 4×4 it’s impossible to move around.  Forget about trying to get power crews in here. Some roads are completely impassable – just like Andrew in ’92 that makes rescue and recovery efforts slow down dramatically. 

 

No-one inside the impact zone is reading this because there is complete infrastructure failure.  No power, no water, no cell towers, no communication, etc.  It’s the old fashioned relay system…  who are you?  what is your status?  who do you need us to contact?  write it down….. then you travel 30 to 40 miles, find a network, and sit down and start making relay calls.

 

Please remember the importance of setting up a communication hub as part of your hurricane plan, this is exactly why

 

 

 

https://theconservat...ller-geography/


-- 

 “Men think in herds and go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.” 

― Charles MacKay